Quick Answer: How Do You Describe A Transformation?

How do you describe a translation?

A translation is a type of transformation that moves each point in a figure the same distance in the same direction.

Translations are often referred to as slides.

You can describe a translation using words like “moved up 3 and over 5 to the left” or with notation..

How do you describe the transformation of a parent function?

The transformation of the parent function is shown in blue. It is a shift down (or vertical translation down) of 1 unit. A reflection on the x-axis is made on a function by multiplying the parent function by a negative. Multiplying by a negative “flips” the graph of the function over the x-axis.

What are some examples of transformation?

What are some examples of energy transformation?The Sun transforms nuclear energy into heat and light energy.Our bodies convert chemical energy in our food into mechanical energy for us to move.An electric fan transforms electrical energy into kinetic energy.More items…

What are the key terms used in describing a transformation?

Remember that transformations are operations that alter the form of a figure. The standard transformations are reflections, translations, rotations, and dilations. Terms are listed in alphabetical order.

How do you calculate transformations?

Here are some things we can do:Move 2 spaces up:h(x) = 1/x + 2.Move 3 spaces down:h(x) = 1/x − 3.Move 4 spaces right:h(x) = 1/(x−4) graph.Move 5 spaces left:h(x) = 1/(x+5)Stretch it by 2 in the y-direction:h(x) = 2/x.Compress it by 3 in the x-direction:h(x) = 1/(3x)Flip it upside down:h(x) = −1/x.

What’s the rule for translation?

The second notation is a mapping rule of the form (x,y) → (x−7,y+5). This notation tells you that the x and y coordinates are translated to x−7 and y+5. The mapping rule notation is the most common. Sarah describes a translation as point P moving from P(−2,2) to P (1,−1).

How do you describe the transformation of a function?

A function transformation takes whatever is the basic function f (x) and then “transforms” it (or “translates” it), which is a fancy way of saying that you change the formula a bit and thereby move the graph around. This is three units higher than the basic quadratic, f (x) = x2. That is, x2 + 3 is f (x) + 3.

How do you describe the transformation of a graph?

if k < 0, the graph translates to the right k units. This one will not be obvious from the patterns you previously used when translating points. A horizontal shift means that every point (x,y) on the graph of f (x) is transformed to (x - k, y) or (x + k, y) on the graphs of y = f (x + k) or y = f (x - k) respectively.

What are the 4 types of transformations?

There are four main types of transformations: translation, rotation, reflection and dilation. These transformations fall into two categories: rigid transformations that do not change the shape or size of the preimage and non-rigid transformations that change the size but not the shape of the preimage.

How do you describe reflection transformation?

A reflection is a type of transformation. It ‘maps’ one shape onto another. When a shape is reflected a mirror image is created. If the shape and size remain unchanged, the two images are congruent.

What are the 7 parent functions?

The following figures show the graphs of parent functions: linear, quadratic, cubic, absolute, reciprocal, exponential, logarithmic, square root, sine, cosine, tangent.

What is an example of a translation?

A translation is a transformation that moves every point in a figure the same distance in the same direction. For example, this transformation moves the parallelogram to the right 5 units and up 3 units. It is written \begin{align*}(x,y) \rightarrow (x+5,y+3)\end{align*}.

How do you describe reflection?

Reflection is when light bounces off an object. If the surface is smooth and shiny, like glass, water or polished metal, the light will reflect at the same angle as it hit the surface. This is called specular reflection.